Sketchbook Selections September 2017

I’m continuing to enjoy the addition of water colour to my drawings. There’s obviously a bit of a learning curve but that’s part of the journey. Here are a couple of my latest renderings.


Pigment pen and water colour

Pigment pen and water colour

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“Bean” There – Done That

There’s a traditional in community theatre of giving small mementos at the end of a play run. It’s not supposed to be anything big or expensive; just a little something to remember the experience. I recently had a role in a play that took place in a coffee shop/bar type place. I made 20 little 4 inch by 5 inch water colour and pigment ink sketches of coffee beans (because of the coffee shop setting) to give to the cast and crew. I didn’t actually need 20 but I was letting people choose which one they liked. They were all a little different and I wanted to have extra so no one felt like they were getting the very last one that no one else wanted. They’re just loose little sketchy things- nothing fancy just fun. Here’s the four I had left over.  

Sketchbook Selections

Here are several selections of recent sketches from my travel sketchbook. I’ve had a number of sketchbooks but this is my old go to comfort one. I’ve been carrying it around in my purse for years. It’s become quite battered with dented corners and dirty edges. These sketches are from the very last pages as the book is finally filled up. I feel a little sad that I won’t be bringing it along with me anymore.

Sketchbook-wren

 

Sketchbook-barn

Sketchbook-downie

Sketchbook-St-Stephens

Sketchbook-bird-post

Sketchbook-Lakeview-Line

Bits and Bobs 6

I’m continuing to fit in little projects between larger pieces. Here’s another piece in the series I’m slowly building that’s based on doodles. It’s acrylic on 8″ x  8″ gessoed hardboard panel.
Dusting of Snow

Below is a study of autumn milkweed rendered in acrylic on rag paper. A subscriber to my other blog – http://www.odds8ends.wordpress.com – asked why I use photos with my posts instead of drawings or paintings. To be honest I never really considered it simply because my own photographs and words have always been the standard I applied when posting there. The study below is a little step into exploring possible methods of creating images to use with text on that blog.

Waiting on the Wind

Studio Bits and Bobs

My rechargeable batteries for my Canon camera have bit the dust so I’ve used my printer scanner to upload some of these images. 

This is a pigment sketch I completed in 2013. I never really liked it (scale was weird- angles were off) so it was the perfect piece to mess around with.

Crowing FloralI decided to add some colour and texture. It was an improvement. But… I hadn’t bothered to secure the paper to keep it from wrinkling when it got wet so it was pretty lumpy. I tried spraying it and weighing it down, several times, but it didn’t work. I had some paper tape that’s normally used for printmaking with rag paper so I thought “what the hey” and soaked the paper and hung it up. Of course the sketch was drawn on cheap sketchbook paper which doesn’t react like print paper and the whole thing became even more of a mess with the glue soaking through the thin paper. I ended up throwing the drawing into the sink, giving it a good rinse, and wiping off as much of the glue as I could. As you can see below it finally ripped and the brown glue stain never came out. All in all I think it was a positive exercise as I learned quite a bit about the limits and characteristics of some of my materials.

Learning exercise

Sometimes when I’m feeling a bit stale I try to doodle my way out of it. I’ve never done anything with the little drawings…until now. I had some small canvases (they don’t look it here but red and blue are 5″ x 7″, the yellow is 8″ x 8″) that weren’t ear marked for anything and decided to take the doodles one step further.   I like how they turned out. They’re just simple little images not really located anywhere. I’m looking forward to completing more and seeing where they go.

Red

Yellow

Blue

Cedar Waxwing

As I mentioned in prior posts I carry a sketchbook with me pretty much everywhere I go. It’s not always possible to work from life as sometimes I’ll find myself in less than idea locations to source material. I  try to anticipate this by tucking things into the back of my sketchbook (a photo or magazine clipping for example) to base drawings on when I have the time but am faced with things like sterile office walls etcetera. Unfortunately I don’t always remember to do so and sometimes I have to work from memory. I received a call late at night to attend to a family matter and just had time to grab my bag and head out the door. I ended up being out for the entire night and during that time I started this sketch. Upon review several days later I discovered my “memory” had been a bit faulty and my bird was looking a little more chickadee than waxwing. The image is rendered in ink pigment so it was a good thing I hadn’t gone too far. I took the opportunity to bring it closer to form once I was able to get a look at the real thing.

Cedar Waxwing

 


Docked at Port Burwell

I spend so much time sitting it’s nice to hit the road with my sketchbook and see what I can find. This piece was an interesting little experiment. The original outline was done, I believe, almost 2 years ago. I had headed out along the lake shore and ended up in Port Burwell. I wasn’t able to finish the sketch onsite as it was a really windy day. I took a picture so I’d have a resource to use later. Fast forward to a week ago when I came across the unfinished sketch and decided to complete it. My first problem was that I no longer knew where the original picture file was . I have a large amount of digital images that aren’t particularly well organized. It’s an issue for me with using a digital camera. It’s easy to shoot so many pictures, that I can’t remember half the time what’s on my computer. When I shot and developed my own film I certainly took a lot more care with my images.  Anyhow I was able to find an image on-line to use which was very fortuitous. What made things a little sticky was the angles that I had already roughed in with pencil and started to work in ink weren’t exactly in-line with those in the found photo.  I ended up having to do some fudging and the perspective has a “folksy” thing going on. I made sure not to overwork the image to keep with the original intent of an onsite piece. Even though I had to complete it in studio, using an alternative image resource, I think it still retains the immediacy that was established as the composition foundation at the Port Burwell pier.

J.P. Siddall, Port Burwell