Sketchbook Selection – May 2018

The Pearce Park is just up the road from where I live and it affords a limited access (the area is a bit unstable because of erosion) to the bluffs along the Lake Erie shoreline. The first sketch below was done last autumn and depicts the view from the outlook path over the cliffs. I was looking at the sketch a couple of days ago and in hindsight found it a little “flat” so I added some colour. The second drawing is a rendering of crown imperials that are growing in the garden at the side of my house. Crown imperials bloom around the same time as trilliums so it’s usually a solid sign that spring (thankfully) has definitely arrived.

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Sketchbook Selections September 2017

I’m continuing to enjoy the addition of water colour to my drawings. There’s obviously a bit of a learning curve but that’s part of the journey. Here are a couple of my latest renderings.


Pigment pen and water colour

Pigment pen and water colour

Trail Sketching

Last week I headed 600 km north to spend 5 days in Killarney Provincial Park. It’s a great time of year to camp up north as there aren’t a lot of bugs out, there aren’t as many people around as in summer, and the fall colours are incredible. With days full of hiking, canoeing, and trying to keep warm (plus the early autumn sunsets), there wasn’t much time for art but I did manage to do some rough, super quick, pen and water colour sketches.

Killarney quick sketch autumn birch

Killarney quick sketch plants

 

Killarney quick sketch George Lake

Docked at Port Burwell

I spend so much time sitting it’s nice to hit the road with my sketchbook and see what I can find. This piece was an interesting little experiment. The original outline was done, I believe, almost 2 years ago. I had headed out along the lake shore and ended up in Port Burwell. I wasn’t able to finish the sketch onsite as it was a really windy day. I took a picture so I’d have a resource to use later. Fast forward to a week ago when I came across the unfinished sketch and decided to complete it. My first problem was that I no longer knew where the original picture file was . I have a large amount of digital images that aren’t particularly well organized. It’s an issue for me with using a digital camera. It’s easy to shoot so many pictures, that I can’t remember half the time what’s on my computer. When I shot and developed my own film I certainly took a lot more care with my images.  Anyhow I was able to find an image on-line to use which was very fortuitous. What made things a little sticky was the angles that I had already roughed in with pencil and started to work in ink weren’t exactly in-line with those in the found photo.  I ended up having to do some fudging and the perspective has a “folksy” thing going on. I made sure not to overwork the image to keep with the original intent of an onsite piece. Even though I had to complete it in studio, using an alternative image resource, I think it still retains the immediacy that was established as the composition foundation at the Port Burwell pier.

J.P. Siddall, Port Burwell