Inktober 2018 – Sketch Selection 13 and 14

The Inktober prompts for these were “Whale” and “Flowing”. The vagueness of the terms allowed for any kind of interpretation. I utilised different marking techniques for each of these images but the designs follow a similar footprint. The eye is drawn from the upper left corner into the page and down for both.  The downward movement is emphasised through the descending verticals of the “whale tails” in the upper drawing. For the lower drawing the downward movement is created through the use of elongated “ribbons” that serve to direct the gaze. Even though the imagery and marks chosen are different they find a common ground in the compositional movement.

 

 

Inktober 2018 – Sketch Selection 7 – 9

The techniques used here are traditional drawing approaches. You can see some crosshatching, scumbling, and stippling. I don’t know if there’s such a thing as using a “good” or “bad” mark (social or political symbols excluded) whilst drawing as long as the marks are applied in a way that effectively reaches the desired conclusion.


 

 

Inktober 2018 – Sketch Selection 4 – 6

Here are three more scans from my 2018 Inktober series. I kept the preliminary pencil work to a minimum attempting to use it specifically for defining overall sections or linear elements rather than detailing. That worked fine for organic material like plants but when it came to anatomy…not so much. That wasn’t a big deal in this context. As an exercise in exploring techniques it’s more interesting figuring out what can be done with the tools at hand rather than meeting a specific aesthetic.

 

 

 

 

Inktober 2018 – Sketch Selection 1 – 3

Every October, artists all over the world take on the Inktober drawing challenge by doing one ink drawing a day the entire month. I didn’t make the whole 30 days but an attempt was made. I chose to use an 8 inch by 5.5 inch sketchbook. The sketches were completed using Staedler pigment liners and a Pigma brush pen. I’m still on my first brush pen and I’m enjoying the opportunity to make a broader variety of marks in comparison to the finer tipped pigment liners.

I’ve been experimenting with my printer scanning function trying to create digital copies that are true to the originals. I’m not entirely there yet. All three of these images were scanned using document scan settings (two in B&W and one in colour) instead of photo scan settings. You can see a marked difference in how the printer records the information. The document settings result in less “noise” so the whites are a truer white (not so much a textured grey). There is some loss of mid-tones using the B&W document copy settings. The colour document copy settings accentuate the brush pen marks making them appear more distinct than in the original piece but the colours are closer to that original. I did add watercolour to the third sketch so I don’t know if it truly follows the Inktober parameters. The composition wasn’t going to work without it and I didn’t have any coloured pens.

Sketchbook Selection – March 2018

The cold and bitter wind seems to be holding on longer this year. I think an all the way thaw is overdue. I was mindlessly doodling around and this was the result. I’m 99.9% sure it has something to do with wishing for warmer days.

 

 

 

 

Bits and Bobs 6

I’m continuing to fit in little projects between larger pieces. Here’s another piece in the series I’m slowly building that’s based on doodles. It’s acrylic on 8″ x  8″ gessoed hardboard panel.
Dusting of Snow

Below is a study of autumn milkweed rendered in acrylic on rag paper. A subscriber to my other blog – http://www.odds8ends.wordpress.com – asked why I use photos with my posts instead of drawings or paintings. To be honest I never really considered it simply because my own photographs and words have always been the standard I applied when posting there. The study below is a little step into exploring possible methods of creating images to use with text on that blog.

Waiting on the Wind

Studio Bits and Bobs

My rechargeable batteries for my Canon camera have bit the dust so I’ve used my printer scanner to upload some of these images. 

This is a pigment sketch I completed in 2013. I never really liked it (scale was weird- angles were off) so it was the perfect piece to mess around with.

Crowing FloralI decided to add some colour and texture. It was an improvement. But… I hadn’t bothered to secure the paper to keep it from wrinkling when it got wet so it was pretty lumpy. I tried spraying it and weighing it down, several times, but it didn’t work. I had some paper tape that’s normally used for printmaking with rag paper so I thought “what the hey” and soaked the paper and hung it up. Of course the sketch was drawn on cheap sketchbook paper which doesn’t react like print paper and the whole thing became even more of a mess with the glue soaking through the thin paper. I ended up throwing the drawing into the sink, giving it a good rinse, and wiping off as much of the glue as I could. As you can see below it finally ripped and the brown glue stain never came out. All in all I think it was a positive exercise as I learned quite a bit about the limits and characteristics of some of my materials.

Learning exercise

Sometimes when I’m feeling a bit stale I try to doodle my way out of it. I’ve never done anything with the little drawings…until now. I had some small canvases (they don’t look it here but red and blue are 5″ x 7″, the yellow is 8″ x 8″) that weren’t ear marked for anything and decided to take the doodles one step further.   I like how they turned out. They’re just simple little images not really located anywhere. I’m looking forward to completing more and seeing where they go.

Red

Yellow

Blue